Philosophy on Teaching


I am a committed and dedicated teacher. I believe in education as a powerful tool in personal development and in social transformation, and my teaching is based on this principle. I design my courses, seminars, and mentoring interactions around educational theories, concepts, and methods. I implement these designs using a wide variety of sources and techniques, aiming to engage students in analysis that matters to their lives. To do so, I seek to connect my students’ academic inquiries to issues that they face personally outside the classroom. I also seek to expand my students’ thinking, to raise their awareness about the lives and experiences of people different from themselves, who might be students in the same classroom or who might live in another part of their own community or the world. Through my teaching and mentoring, I aim to help students come to understand themselves better as individuals, as members of groups, and as contributors to society.

 

Courses


Interviewing in Qualitative Research

Harvard Graduate School of Education

In this course, students are immersed in the entire cycle of qualitative interviewing by engaging in an interviewing study from start to finish. They frame the research questions, build relationships with research participants, develop interview guides, conduct interviews, transcribe interviews, code data, engage in thematic analysis, and present initial findings to the research participants. One student noted that through this experience she “was able to see and therefore internalize, very complex ‘understandings’ of qualitative interview[ing] that, up to this point, I had mostly grasped intellectually—grasped more in theory than in practice.” Working together on one research project, students can reach “saturation” rapidly over the course of the 32 in-depth interviews they are able to do collectively over one semester. Immersed in the same research site and the same data, we are able as a learning community to discuss emerging themes based on shared evidence and challenge each other with relevant discrepant data. Given the shared experience, we are also able to probe more deeply aspects of our identity and issues of reflexivity. Finally, in the context of the research project, we are able to have conversations about building research relationships, ethical dilemmas, and inequalities in education that are concretely based on shared experiences, observations, and data.
Syllabus

Listening Notes: A Brief Guide

 

Education in Armed Conflict

Harvard Graduate School of Education

Education in Armed Conflict takes as its overarching question the role of education in building lasting peace. It has three goals: (1) to provide a foundation in theories, policies, and practices that are relevant to education in settings of armed conflict; (2) to create opportunities for structured practice and mentorship in skills of writing, research, and relationship-building; and (3) to cultivate in students the capacities to think “vertically” (Bartlett & Vavrus, 2014), particularly to connect global policies with daily experiences of children and families in education. Follow this course on Twitter with #HGSEA816
Syllabus

Commentary on course: